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How To Make Your New House Your Own

When we settle into a new space, it can take quite a while for it to really feel like ‘home’ and that can cause a few issues for many of us. 

You may feel a little on edge, unable to unwind or possibly even unsafe or lacking privacy if you haven’t taken all of the steps to make your new house your own, and so it’s a good idea to get on to this as soon as possible. 

As we’re sure you’ll agree, you want to be able to relax and settle into the new space and really get the most out of it, especially if you’re working from home and expected to be productive and attentive for long periods of time. 

That said, we have a quick few tips for making your new house your own below. 

Customise the Space 

Off the top, one of the first things you should work to do is add some custom-ness to the space, which often includes adding art, family photos or other sculptural elements about the home. 

This will help you ‘ground’ the space and add some familiarity atop those cold white walls that you’ve just moved into. 

On top of this, consider getting out some old rugs and other decor items from your previous home and work to scatter these about the new space.

Add Some Childhood Memorabilia 

An often forgotten element to add to a new home are some childhood items, or at least some decor furnishings that remind you of your childhood. 

These not only add a dash of the customizability we mentioned above, but they will also ease your mind and remind you of simpler times, and possibly happier and more cherished times as well. 

These things can include everything from trophies, furniture items, toys (as decor items) and so much more. 

Set Up Entertaining or Hangout Spaces

If you’ve only just moved in, there’s a good chance you’re not looking to throw a party right away, however, it is still a good idea to invest in some essentials for the garden and patio spaces. 

With auction sites like Grays, it’s easy to find hardware and furniture brands that you can use to furnish and amplify your space and make it feel truly like your own. 

It’s a good idea to consider adding elements that also get you some more use out of the spaces in your new home and make them a little more dual-purpose or multiuse. This way, if you have a smaller home, for example, you’re able to feel cozy, safe and comfortable in more than one space. 

Consider A Cohesive Style 

Another key tip from us is to make sure that you’re going all-out on the style cohesion in your home. 

When we first move into our homes, there’s a good chance you’ve rushed to ‘get in’ the home and haven’t taken too much consideration into the home’s look, feel and how it operates – and so now it’s time to do this! 

You’re going to want to do what you can with regards to getting your home looking and feeling like yours in as many spaces as you can. This means keeping a simple and cohesive colour tone, running the same decor items through the house and also making sure that things like lighting, bedding, fabrics and other essentials seamlessly blend together. 

Greenery Always Helps

When we speak of being custom and tuned to you and what you like, there is little that beats out the plants. And so we suggest getting in some of your favourite plants to spice the space up. 

It is a fact that plants make us feel safer, happier, cozier and inspire us at home, and so you’re going to do yourself a big favour here when it comes to integrating some of your favourite foliage into the new house. 

You could also consider things like flowers and other decorative vegetation in the home too, which will add a personal green touch to the space. 

With all of those points in mind, there is a tonne you can do to add a personal touch to your new house and truly make it feel like your own. 

Always be mindful of the style cohesion and whether specific elements in the home are tailored to your lifestyle preferences and go from here. Added to this, consider how you use your home and make a few decor and furniture changes and you’re on the right track. 

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